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JRV Style Guideline

We ask all contributors to abide by the following style guidelines.
To download a PDF style manual, please click here.



TITLES, HEADINGS, AND SUBHEADINGS

Major section titles: Center, bold and capitalize

TITLE

1st level subtitles: Left margin, bold, major words capitalized

First Section

2nd level subtitles: Left margin, italicize, major words capitalized 

Second Level, Subtitles

Indents:  Indent first line paragraph, except after a title, where there is no indent.


PROSE STYLE
 

American.  So ending punctuation in phrases or sentences goes before the quotation marks.  Footnote notations go after quotation marks, typically.  So:

 
Examples

“Here is a sentence.” 

“Here is a sentence,” but it is not very clear.

“Here is one followed by a footnoted comment.”1

 
 
FOOTNOTES
 
Simple references
 

State postal abbreviations (MA, CA, NJ, DC, etc.) Inclusive page numbers formatted as: 123-125
  
When referencing a note: 125n6 (i.e. page 125, note 6)

Before 5.1, simple, source references should be parenthetical and in-text (Smith 2010, 10).
From 5.1 ff, all citations should go to footnotes.

Examples

 
1Smith 2010.
1Smith 2010, 10.
 

Second book or article by same author same year: 
1Smith 2010b, 13.


Substantive footnotes

 
 Parenthetical source follows sentence, or follows thought attributed to source.
 
Examples: 

1Contemporary scholars of Buddhism note the error in ascribing a thoroughly pacific nature to Buddhist traditions in their historical entirety (Jerryson 2030, 15-20).  

2For discussion see Kitts (2010, 3).

3I translate here with Iseri (1991, 210), who captures both nuances.

 
Footnoting lists of sources

Note the subtleties: 
Diana’s rule of thumb: if separating citations by semicolons, no parentheses are necessary; if separating by commas, use parentheses. 
 
Examples
 

1Zone (2012), Jerryson (2016), and Miller (1985) think one way, while Thompson (1999) thinks the opposite. 

See, e.g., Grottanelli 1989, 272-332; Jenks 1992, 250-254; Pollock 2003, 17-38. 

3See Grottanelli 1989, 272-232.
 

When referencing a footnote or endnote, it is: 125n6 (i.e. page 125, note 6)

 
BIBLIOGRAPHY

Only actually cited works to go in bib.  Footnote citations count as cited works.   

Please note:  
It is no longer necessary to include the city name for university press books.  Do keep the city name for commercial presses.  So Juergensmeyer, Mark, Margo Kitts, and Michael Jerryson, eds. 2013.  Oxford Handbook of Religion and Violence.  Oxford University Press.

But

Beckman, Gary. 1996. Hittite Diplomatic Texts. Vol. 1. Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press.

Book with one author



Reference List Entries Book with a single author:

Smith, John. Date.  Book Title.  City: Publisher.  (City omitted if a university press book)

Example

King, Winston L.  1994.  Zen and the Way of the Sword. Oxford University Press. 

Second book by same author, same year.

Smith, John R. 2010.  Book Title. New York: Press. [first book]

            2010b.  Book Title. New York: Press. [second book]

Examples

Firestone, Reuven.  2012.  Holy War in Judaism: The Rise of a Controversial Idea. Oxford University Press.

            2012b.  Who are the Real Chosen People?  Boston: Skylight Paths.

Ditto for articles.

Second book by same author, different year.

Smith, John R. 2010.  Book Title.  New York: Penguin.

            2012.  Book Title.  New York: Penguin.

Examples

Firestone, Reuven.  2012.  Holy War in Judaism: The Rise of a Controversial Idea. Oxford University Press.

            2010.  Who are the Real Chosen People?  Boston: Skylight Paths.


Book with two or more authors:

Ward, Geoffrey C., and Ken Burns. 2007. The War: An Intimate History, 1941–1945. New York: Knopf.

Book with an editor in place of an author:

Johnson, Amy, ed. 2014. Book Title: Subtitle. University of Chicago Press.


Second book by same editor:

Johnson, Amy, ed. 2014. Book Title: Subtitle. University of Chicago Press. (first)

             2014b.  Book Title: Subtitle.  University of Chicago Press. (second)


Book with an author plus and editor or translator:

García Márquez, Gabriel. 1988. Love in the Time of Cholera. Translated by Edith Grossman. London: Cape.  

  
Chapter in an edited book:

Gould, Glenn. 1984. “Streisand as Schwarzkopf.” In The Glenn Gould Reader, edited by Tim Page, 308– 311. New York: Vintage.

Journal article:

Blair, Walter. 1977. “Americanized Comic Braggarts.” Critical Inquiry 4 (2): 331–349.

Articles consulted online:

Karmaus, Wilfried, and John F. Riebow. 2004. “Storage of Serum in Plastic and Glass Containers May Alter the Serum Concentration of Polychlorinated Biphenyls.” Environmental Health Perspectives 112 (May): 643–647. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3435987.

or, if a DOI is provided, this is preferred to a URL:

Novak, William J. 2008. “The Myth of the ‘Weak’ American State.” American Historical Review 113:
752–772. doi: http://dx.doi.org10.1086/ahr.113.3.752.
  

In-text Author-Date Citations:

... sentence (Pollan 2006; Greenberg 2008, 320; García Márquez 1988, 150; Gould 1984; Wilfried and Riebow 2004).
  

In Notes:

Pollan, Omnivore’s Dilemma; Karmaus and Riebow, “Storage of Serum,” 644-645 



For more information and grammatical tips, download the PDF Style guide here.